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August Training Tips

431px-Sandow1Training Harder and Smarter

August is a month for challenging yourself. Throughout this season you’ve already logged around 1,500 miles or more (which is about halfway across the U.S.). With a great base, you’re ready for one last hard push. A key component of multi-day events is the ability to repeat efforts day after day. To ensure you’re ready for CO, use the next four weeks for back-to-back days of longer riding. However, surviving this year’s climbing will also take a little more than just long rides for training. While long rides are great for aerobic development and saddle time, climbing requires increased intensity. This is where your training drills come in. They’re designed to stimulate increases in the buffering mechanisms involved in allowing anaerobic glycolysis to continue. In other words, you can maintain “leg burn” for longer with more comfort.

Mileage: 155-210+ miles per week.

Ride Pace: Focus on back-to-back days of long riding. Training drill days consist of HIGH levels of effort.

Training Drills:

Weeks 1-3: Lactic Capacity

Hard Riding: 90-120 seconds

Recovery Pace: 60-120 seconds

Repeat 3 times for 1 set (after one set take 4-8 minutes recovery)

Complete 2-4 sets

Frequency: 2 times per week

Week 4: Lactic Power

Sprint: 20-40 seconds

Recovery Pace: 60-180 seconds

Repeat 3 times for 1 set (after one set take 4-8 minutes recovery)

Complete 2-4 sets

Frequency: 2 times per week

2-4 X   3(20-40s : 60-180s)

Here is a quick example of a Lactic Capacity workout: hard riding 90 seconds, rest 60 seconds, hard riding 90 seconds, rest 60 seconds, hard riding 90 seconds, rest 60 seconds; that’s one set. Rest 4-8 minutes and repeat everything 1-3 times.

Recovery: Last month we gave some recovery strategies and many people had additional questions. Here is a little more detail, with examples and explanations.

The first thing to remember is that if you don’t enjoy one of these recovery methods you probably shouldn’t use it. Part of the recovery process is getting your autonomic nervous system in check. If a method creates too much negative stress it won’t be helpful.

Massage (soft tissue therapy):

Low-intensity relaxation techniques should be used

Hot Water Therapy:

Ideally 102 degrees for 5-25 minutes

Nutritional Strategy:

Increase absorption of food with digestive enzymes.

Reduce inflammation with foods featuring increased alkalines and omega-3s

If you have more questions about why and how these methods work, email Paul@stradalife.com.

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